Germany’s migrants and refugees

Good journalism by the Globe & Mail on “Where are all the refugees who came into former Germany mainly during the years 2015 and 2016, when all doors had been wide open. [Merkel:”Wir können das schon schaffen.”] [ https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/where-are-all-the-refugees/article35827259/ ] I see this from a different perspective, as I actually used to be a German citizen, by birth, by my parents’ birth, and probably centuries of Germans. Over and above the last of my relatives who never left their country, like I did, are still residing there. In above Globe & Mail article, mostly referring to the social stats on the years of the major refugees’ movements into Germany, the questions had been raised whether Germany had a problem accommodating all those (maybe refugees, maybe not) newcomers, and providing an integration platform for them. But what had been behind all that tremendous effort and work to make this happen, I am certain the Globe & Mail who do not actually on a daily basis reside in that country know little.

How much damage it has done to the government of that country (nobody can agree with anybody, coalitions are week, and neo-nazi culture is blooming).

I myself having been a German citizen of course, having survived WWII and the bombings, and the destruction of that country, having witnessed since 1945 first the arrival of the communist sympathizers, then the socialist governments, then for all those years the movements of entire populations from all countries from anywhere into Germany (with its doors wide open), and since years the coming of the AFD (Alternative Für Deutschland), who even want to make all things worse for everybody.

I know what is happening, not the Globe & Mail journalists, with their commentaries.

I speak the language, I talk to the Germans – the real ones – who must live there, and we discuss politics and how it feels to live in today’s Germany, where most citizens and residents or migrants are from different countries and cultures.

Why don’t you go and read: Thilo Sarrazin: “Deutschland schafft sich ab.” The crises of a social state and the dramatic demographical influences created by the large influx of migrants. He put it right in his book.

To make this short, even if it gives the impression that Germany accomplished the almost impossible of a seamless integration of all peoples and cultures, the country of Germany does not exist anymore. It is a patchwork of nations where everybody can help him/herself to a piece of the pie. In fact there is no integration nor assimilation at all, even nations residing there for over 50 years speak no German. Everybody is doing their own stuff, as long as they get paid government money.

 

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Citizenship Injustice

Loosing one’s citizenship of birth is a big deal, especially if the new country of citizenship has not been acquired in the course of regular or desired immigration, but merely due to circumstance and under duress.
Canadian citizenship usually is easy to acquire, provided there is proof of employment (at least this was the case forty years ago when we arrived) or maybe a sponsor – some sort of relative who lives here already. Dual citizenship used to be more difficult. Many larger European countries removed birth citizenship from any of their citizens once they assumed Canadian. Of course, Canada does not care much about dual, but it is the country of birth that controls it – either keep it or loose it.
In between there were multiple citizenship and immigration reforms, one of them allowing dual citizenship under the following circumstances: At the time when applying for the Canadian one must prove that there is still a bind with the home country, family or property or other. In my case, my entire family never left their country, they are all in Europe, only myself and at that time my little son were in Canada.
Unfortunately, all this happening before the European Union (EU) came into being.
Also in between and many years ago my son – who has dual citizenship because he was born in a smaller European country – returned to his home country for good.  Meanwhile I am still in Canada, still only Canadian citizenship, and when travelling to my home country am forced to go to the Foreigners’ Office to buy myself an extension for stay, else stay is limited to three months.
To argue: why do those who do not care about Canadian citizenship – because they neither live here anymore nor are interested in Canadian affairs – still keep and retain dual citizenship including Canadian, while at the same time those who decided to immigrate to Canada retain theirs, although they never even visit their home country anymore.
We should allow dual citizenship for those Canadians who are longtime taxpayers in this country and receive pensions in this country, but have all of their family residing in Europe. This not also because of complicated taxation issues arising out of income in both countries, but mainly to make a long term visit to their families, instead of only a measly three months.