Alberta oil industry smoking in work place

SS-SECOND HAND SMOKE

Contains approx. 4,000 chemicals, dangerous to the non-smoker who is near a smoker. Worse in the workplace where humans must work and stay all day long. A person who breathes secondhand smoke is breathing the same chemicals as someone smoking. During my over ten years in Alberta’s oil industry I was actively inhaling those chemicals.

While developing an unwanted craving for it, caused by second-hand smokers. I am a non-smoker. Sinus surgery, respiratory problems. Thank you, Mr. Oil company executive for your impressive social responsibility propaganda.

Alberta big oil – in support of smokers – against all principles of their proclaimed social responsibility.

Why ? because smokers are more productive ? or, at times of intense periods of oil companies’ takeovers and layoffs, its easier to kill employees with second-hand smoke, rather than being forced (for pretense) to pay them (Micky mouse) severance pay to get rid of them ? (Micky mouse meaning 3 months’ pay or a little over $10,000 – that was in the 1980s).

Here is the interesting part of this (my insider) story: Those who were heavy smokers on the job sites, in offices, remained in their jobs, when after another corporate takeover many positions were culled and long-time employees were laid off.

Examples of being exposed to second-hand smoke: In the systems and computer department we were mostly housed in one big area, each having their cubicle. On and off, I also had an office – as project leader. Some of the heaviest smokers, they put two in an office, pretending to somehow shut them inside away from others.

For many months, and years, I suffered, inhaling second-hand smoke. During that time I also had a sinus surgery – around 1983. Resulting to have to come to work with blood running from my sinus cavities into my throat daily.

Hudson’s Bay Oil & Gas Co. – first one I started working when coming to Calgary January 1977. As Senior Systems Analyst & project leader for computer projects. There was this one guy – always smoking. Carrying his smoking cigarette in his hand while walking in open spaces. I had just got myself a new office suit, he managed to burn a hole into it. No excuses or offer to repair.

Then in 1983 oil company takeover by TCPL (TransCanada Pipelines) Resources. By 1986 massive layoff campaigns had started. For this, Headquarters in Toronto sent down an ENFORCER. Who was charged with severe harassment of computer professionals and employees, daily changing assignment routines, moving people around, assigning me as senior project leader with company-wide studies on ‘How to eliminate certain positions’. Which entailed for me to interview former colleagues and friends. Needless to say, they were not happy with that ! And then present a report of recommendations to those now in charge with laying off the same people I was forced to interview. Filthy attempt of creating diversion and resentment.

At the same time I had to complete my major projects of converting all software to 4th gen DB systems architecture, lots of work still to do with all those programs.

As a result of all of this ? I lost my home in Alberta, and my family. My son left for the United States in 1990 to also do his graduate studies there, far away in Alabama. Stayed for thirteen years, then decided to move back to his homeland, the Netherlands.

While I staid behind alone, being unfortunately now a Canadian citizen. Just memories of corrupt companies.

[Previous posts on this s.a. [ https://renataveritashistory.com/2013/07/06/smoking-in-the-work-place-tcpl-resources/ ]

Golden Parachute – for Loosers

WOW ! Listing here only a few of them: Exxon Mobil Corp. former Chief Executive Officer Lee Raymond tops the list with a $351 million payout.  Stan O’Neal, former CEO of Merryl Lynch – 161 million for his retirement/ousting, (after reporting a $2.24 billion loss and the biggest quarterly loss in the company’s 93-year history).  Stephen Elop, former CEO of Nokia – 25 million as a Good-Bye present. Mike Nafirovski, Nortel – 3.4 million (after having requested 12 million), in 2009, when stepping down from a bankrupt company.  Hank McKinnell of Pfizer – a whooping 213 million in 2006 after the company’s stock decline by 40%. Carly Fiorina of Hewlett Packard – 42 million after being forced out.
[NOTE. the above payouts in dollars slightly below or above, depending on the market sources.].
What do they all have in common ? They fucked up big corporations in their capacity as CEO or otherwise at the helm of those companies.
In contrast, compare that with any of the companies within the oil and pipeline industry in their relationships towards professional employees:
Following a takeover within that industry (which happened and still probably does happen frequently), a ‘Kick in the butt to hard-working professionals’ – ZERO cents. Message often was: “Walk out and go home”, especially to vulnerable groups of employees such as women or single mothers. Example: the likes of Trans Canada (TCPL, early 1980’s), and many more of that genre.